Changes for clojure.core/apply

zkim on Thu, 04 Nov 2010
;; If you were to try
user=> (max [1 2 3])
[1 2 3]

;; You would get '[1 2 3]' for the result. In this case, 'max' has received one
;; vector argument, and the largest of its arguments is that single vector.

;; If you would like to find the largest item **within** the vector, you would need
;; to use `apply`

user=> (apply max [1 2 3])
3

;; which is the same as (max 1 2 3)
zkim on Sun, 26 Sep 2010
;; If you were to try
user=> (max [1 2 3])
[1 2 3]

;; You would get '[1 2 3]' for the result. In this case, 'max' has received one vector
;; argument, and the largest of its arguments is that single vector.

;; If you would like to find the largest item **within** the vector, you would need to
;; use `apply`

user=> (apply max [1 2 3])
3

;; which is the same as (max 1 2 3)
gregg-williams on Tue, 21 Sep 2010
If you were to try
(max [1 2 3])


You would get `[1 2 3]` for the result. In this case, `max` has received one vector argument, and the largest of its arguments is that single vector.

If you would like to find the largest item **within** the vector, you would need to use `apply`

(apply max [1 2 3])


which is the same as (max 1 2 3)
Jacolyte on Mon, 26 Jul 2010
If you were to try

(max [1 2 3])


You would get `[1 2 3]` for the result. In this case, `max` has received one vector argument, and the largest of its arguments is that single vector.

If you would like to find the largest item **within** the vector, you would need to use `apply`


(apply max [1 2 3])